JUVEDERM™ injectable gel is a smooth gel filler your doctor eases under your skin to instantly smooth out those wrinkles or folds that look like parentheses along the side of your nose and mouth Juvederm fills the skin and eliminates these wrinkles instantly.

Juvederm Before and After Close

Juvederm Before and After

RESTYLANE™ is designed to smooth wrinkles, sculpt lips and shape facial contours. It is a clear gel composed of hyaluronic acid, a natural substance that is found throughout your body. This synthetic acid carries no risk of allergic reaction. With its unique ability to bind with water, RESTYLANE remains in your skin for many months. Vytale physicians also use other fillers such as Cosmoderm and Cosmoplast.

Restylane

Please go to the Restylane website for more information: www.Restylaneusa.com

Before and After Pictures of Restylane Patients:

Restylane Before and After

Hyaluronan is naturally found in many tissues of the body, such as skin, cartilage, and the vitreous humour. It is therefore well suited to biomedical applications targeting these tissues. The first hyaluronan biomedical product, Healon, was developed in the 1970s and 1980s by Pharmacia, and is approved for use in eye surgery (i.e., corneal transplantation, cataract surgery, glaucoma surgery and surgery to repair retinal detachment). Other biomedical companies also produce brands of hyaluronan for ophthalmic surgery.

Hyaluronan is also used to treat osteoarthritis of the knee. Such treatments, called viscosupplementation, are administered as a course of injections into the knee joint and are believed to supplement the viscosity of the joint fluid, thereby lubricating the joint, cushioning the joint, and producing an analgesic effect. It has also been suggested that hyaluronan has positive biochemical effects on cartilage cells. However, some placebo controlled studies have cast doubt on the efficacy of hyaluronan injections, and hyaluronan is recommended primarily as a last alternative to surgery. Oral use of hyaluronan has been lately suggested, although its effectiveness needs to be demonstrated. At present, there are some preliminary clinical studies that suggest that oral administration of Hyaluronan has a positive effect on osteoarthritis, but it remains to be seen if there is any real benefit to the treatment.

Due to its high biocompatibility and its common presence in the extracellular matrix of tissues, hyaluronan is gaining popularity as a biomaterial scaffold in tissue engineering research.

In some cancers, hyaluronan levels correlate well with malignancy and poor prognosis. Hyaluronan is thus often used as a tumor marker for prostate and breast cancer. It may also be used to monitor the progression of the disease.

Hyaluronan may also be used postoperatively to induce tissue healing, notably after cataract surgery. Current models of wound healing propose that larger polymers of hyaluronic acid appear in the early stages of healing to physically make room for white blood cells, which mediate the immune response.

Hyaluronan has also been used in the synthesis of biological scaffolds for wound healing applications. These scaffolds typically have proteins such as fibronectin attached to the hyaluronan to facilitate cell migration into the wound. This is particularly important for individuals with diabetes who suffer from chronic wounds.

In 2007, the EMEA extended its approval of Hylan GF-20 as a treatment for ankle and shoulder osteoarthritis pain.

Collagens are widely employed in the construction of artificial skin substitutes used in the management of severe burns. These collagens may be derived from bovine, equine or porcine, and even human, sources and are sometimes used in combination with silicones, glycosaminoglycans, fibroblasts, growth factors and other substances.

Collagen is also sold commercially as a joint mobility supplement. This lacks supportive research as the proteins would just be broken down into its base amino acids during digestion, and could go to a variety of places besides the joints depending upon need and DNA orders.

Recently an alternative to animal-derived collagen has become available. Although expensive, this human collagen, derived from donor cadavers, placentas and aborted fetuses, may minimize the possibility of immune reactions.

Collagen is now being used as a main ingredient for some cosmetic makeup.